Candidates Want More in 2021!

Credit: Susan Muldowney for SEEK

https://www.seek.com.au/employer/hiring-advice/thawing-the-pay-freeze-candidates-want-more-in-2021


The economic fallout of COVID-19 saw many businesses forced to hit the brakes on salaries in 2020.

But with a record number of job ads on SEEK in the first half of this year, and a steady decline in application numbers, money looks set to be a more valuable tool in attracting and retaining talent. And candidates and employees are expecting more.


Research for SEEK shows 37% of Australians expect a salary increase this year. This compares to 22% in June 2020. And while only 4% received a promotion last year, 7% now expect their role to be upgraded.


Mark Smith, Managing Director of People2People, says there is a growing understanding among employers that salary increases are required to stay ahead of the competition.


“We haven't seen this major push on salaries for some time,” he says. “More employers understand the cost of having somebody leave is going to be so much more than if they pay them an extra $5,000 or $10,000 to stay. This is especially the case now when the market is so tight for talent.”


As an employer or business owner, numbers like this can be confronting – especially given the economic challenges of the past 18 months. But in this current climate, it’s important to start to bring pay and benefits back into consideration where possible.


Time for annual increases?


Wage growth in Australia had slowed even before the economic disruption of COVID-19, but an increasing number of candidates are keen to speed it up.


Benchmarking and annually reviewing salaries can help candidates know that you’re serious about salaries. Of course, not all businesses may be able to conduct benchmarking and salary reviews at this level – but there may be ways to review and adjust salaries on a smaller scale. It’s also important to acknowledge that not all businesses will be able to afford pay increases, either. This is where other options are worth considering.


Consider work perks


While salary increases are a growing priority, candidates and employees are willing to consider some extra benefits as a trade-off. For some businesses, this may be a more financially viable way to find or retain staff.


Not all perks need to have a direct financial cost. Increased annual leave (19%) and more flexible working arrangements (17%) are the top benefits people nominate as an alternative to not receiving a boost to their pay packet.


While a full program of benefits may be out of scope for smaller businesses, offering even one or two selected perks or benefits could make a difference when it comes to attracting and retaining employees. You might consider talking to staff about which benefits would be most valuable to them.


Setting expectations


As the economy continues its recovery from the pandemic, the salary conversation is coming back into the spotlight. Twice as many candidates would opt for higher remuneration than an opportunity to work less, and fewer than two in five have accepted, or would be willing to accept, a promotion without a pay rise.


The research also shows only a third of candidates are comfortable talking to their boss about a salary increase. With money higher on the candidate agenda, Smith says transparency around pay is even more important in attracting top talent.


He recommends including salary in job ads to set clear expectations from the start – and to save time for both hiring managers and candidates if salary expectations can’t be met.


Salary was once an awkward subject for many candidates, but they’re now more willing to put money on the table. Employees are also expecting a pay rise this year – and current market dynamics are leading more employers to consider salary as an even more powerful attraction and retention tool. It may be time to review your approach to salary and benefits to see where you can keep up with the competition.


Source: Independent research conducted by Nature of behalf of SEEK, interviewing 4800 Australians annually. Published July 2021.

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